3 Simple Principles That Will Help You Develop Good Habits

3 Simple Principles That Will Help You Develop Good Habits

Journaling is a good way to track good habits that you want to develop.  

Journaling is a good way to track good habits that you want to develop.  

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What are good habits?  

Good habits are patterns of behavior that improve your quality of life. Unlike bad habits, good habits empower you to live your life to the fullest and drive your career goals forward.  

Developing good habits is difficult. Regardless of what habit you’re trying to develop it can be hard to muster the self-control to improve your behavior.  

No judgment here!  We understand that it takes a lot of self-control to develop good habits that change our lives.  

So how do you find that self-control?

Finding your motivation  

Motivation will make or break your plan to develop good habits. The amount of motivation you have will determine how willing you are to follow through on your plans.  

For this reason, it’s important to discover where your motivations lie.

Are you someone who feels motivated and capable to make improvements? Or do you feel like you don’t have what it takes to improve yourself? To know that, you need to figure out where your locus of control lies.

Loci of control are a psychological concept that explain how people view their personal autonomy. Developed by psychologist Julian Rotter in 1950, loci of control were originally designed to assess people’s personalities.  

People with an external locus of control feel that control over their lives exist outside themselves. People with this worldview feel as if they’re at the mercy of their environment and that what they do to change their circumstances don’t matter.  

Meanwhile, those with an internal locus of control believe in their ability to determine their destiny. These people are likely to have take-charge personalities and are more willing to take responsibility for their actions than those with an internal locus of self-control.  

If you’re someone who has an internal locus of control, developing good habits will be easier for you but if not, remember to give yourself positive affirmations.

The first step to developing good habits is to believe in your capability to make these habits happen.

Break large goals into small ones

Goal setting and planning are key to developing good habits.

When you first start planning a goal, what’s the first thing you visualize? More likely than not, you imagine the final goal itself.  

But do you know this can be detrimental to your goals?  

Visualizing your long-term goals can inspire you. But it can also demotivate you by making a goal seem far away. Approaching goals in this way can also make it harder for you to pinpoint the steps you need to take to develop good habits.

What you need to develop good habits aren’t just long-term goals but SMART goals.

SMART goals were originally proposed by George T. Doran in Management Review. SMART is an acronym which stands for specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.  

By breaking large goals into smaller ones, you can slowly develop the habits needed to achieve these goals.

Stick to a routine  

Another key principle that can help you develop good habits is to stick to a routine. There’s no better way to make sure you do something regularly than to set it into a routine.

There are two ways in which sticking to a routine helps you develop goods habits.

On the practical side, a routine makes it easier to remember and commit to the habit you’re trying to develop. Routine also integrates a habit into your daily life which gets you used to performing that habit.

But there’s another aspect you might not realize and that’s the psychological benefit of setting a habit.

Decision fatigue is what happens when you begin to feel mentally exhausted from making decisions throughout your day. Decision fatigue lowers your self-control and makes you more likely to act in a way that’s detrimental to your goals.  

Developing good habits is hard. Trust me, we’ve all been there! But by following these three key principles, you can make the task of developing good habits easier and more attainable for you.

What are good habits?  

Good habits are patterns of behavior that improve your quality of life. Unlike bad habits, good habits empower you to live your life to the fullest and drive your career goals forward.  

Developing good habits is difficult. Regardless of what habit you’re trying to develop it can be hard to muster the self-control to improve your behavior.  

No judgment here!  We understand that it takes a lot of self-control to develop good habits that change our lives.  

So how do you find that self-control?

Finding your motivation  

Motivation will make or break your plan to develop good habits. The amount of motivation you have will determine how willing you are to follow through on your plans.  

For this reason, it’s important to discover where your motivations lie.

Are you someone who feels motivated and capable to make improvements? Or do you feel like you don’t have what it takes to improve yourself? To know that, you need to figure out where your locus of control lies.

Loci of control are a psychological concept that explain how people view their personal autonomy. Developed by psychologist Julian Rotter in 1950, loci of control were originally designed to assess people’s personalities.  

People with an external locus of control feel that control over their lives exist outside themselves. People with this worldview feel as if they’re at the mercy of their environment and that what they do to change their circumstances don’t matter.  

Meanwhile, those with an internal locus of control believe in their ability to determine their destiny. These people are likely to have take-charge personalities and are more willing to take responsibility for their actions than those with an internal locus of self-control.  

If you’re someone who has an internal locus of control, developing good habits will be easier for you but if not, remember to give yourself positive affirmations.

The first step to developing good habits is to believe in your capability to make these habits happen.

Break large goals into small ones

Goal setting and planning are key to developing good habits.

When you first start planning a goal, what’s the first thing you visualize? More likely than not, you imagine the final goal itself.  

But do you know this can be detrimental to your goals?  

Visualizing your long-term goals can inspire you. But it can also demotivate you by making a goal seem far away. Approaching goals in this way can also make it harder for you to pinpoint the steps you need to take to develop good habits.

What you need to develop good habits aren’t just long-term goals but SMART goals.

SMART goals were originally proposed by George T. Doran in Management Review. SMART is an acronym which stands for specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.  

By breaking large goals into smaller ones, you can slowly develop the habits needed to achieve these goals.

Stick to a routine  

Another key principle that can help you develop good habits is to stick to a routine. There’s no better way to make sure you do something regularly than to set it into a routine.

There are two ways in which sticking to a routine helps you develop goods habits.

On the practical side, a routine makes it easier to remember and commit to the habit you’re trying to develop. Routine also integrates a habit into your daily life which gets you used to performing that habit.

But there’s another aspect you might not realize and that’s the psychological benefit of setting a habit.

Decision fatigue is what happens when you begin to feel mentally exhausted from making decisions throughout your day. Decision fatigue lowers your self-control and makes you more likely to act in a way that’s detrimental to your goals.  

Developing good habits is hard. Trust me, we’ve all been there! But by following these three key principles, you can make the task of developing good habits easier and more attainable for you.

Written by Allia Luzong

Written by Allia Luzong

Journaling is a good way to track good habits that you want to develop.

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Copyright 2020 ©

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