Open Communication  

Open Communication  

If you like this article, please share with your friends. 

If you like this article, please share with your friends. 

Maybe you would like to listen to this article

Maybe you would like to listen to this article

OR

OR

to learn as you go

to learn as you go

Speaking up takes a lot of courage for some people, and if you believe you’re one of them, it’s no coincidence that you’ve stumbled upon this blog. Take it as a sign that you need to gradually build a more open relationship with people present in your life; understand that by ‘relationship’, it doesn’t necessarily mean a romantic one, it can also mean the type of bond you have with your parents, siblings, children, or peers. Make a self-assessment and try to reflect on whether or not you’ve restricted yourself in times you’ve badly needed to speak up. Do you feel uncomfortable or anxious in expressing yourself to your life-partner? Are you afraid of being misinterpreted, judged, or getting laughed at by your relatives? Do you worry that your honesty may cause a close colleague of yours to feel sad or angry? If you happen to find these questions painfully relatable or agreeable, you better realize that you deserve more amount of respect you give yourself. If you care about other people’s thoughts and feelings, shouldn’t you care the same way to your own? Establish a better you and a better social relationship with open communication.  

During my younger years, I’ve dealt spending most of my time with friends who’ve unconsciously put me down. I never had the guts to confront them when I’d feel offended or disappointed with their words or actions; it was an unhealthy decision of mine to fake a laugh or do just about any act that’d make me seem unaffected. I hated the fact that I had to restrict myself from speaking my mind, but at the same time, I couldn’t help but be afraid of the possible aftermath if I did. I wanted these people to understand me, but I didn’t let them until I couldn’t bear to keep it in my system anymore.  

I want you to learn from my experience, and maybe if you had quite a similar issue from the past, you can do some self-tweaking. After all, you owe it to yourself and also to the people who care enough to understand you. Your voice matters and never think otherwise, because it really does. You need to step up and stop overthinking about how’d people react. Get it in your head that people are human too; they have individual thoughts and feelings just like you, so what’s the point of trying so hard to contain yours?  

If you’re having trouble in academics – speak up. If you’re in need of financial support – speak up. If you want to stand up for someone vulnerable – speak up. Open communication is your key; admit it to yourself and practice it.  

­­­­­­There are more advantages to speaking up than just being acknowledged or heard. Somehow it helps avoid future conflicts or problems from happening or arising, it strengthens the relationships you have with people who revolve around your life, and it generally encourages a person to learn from one another. It’s fascinating what our voices can do; and I believe we won’t stand a chance in this world without it. I wish I had realized and applied all these things I’ve mentioned much sooner. But having the opportunity to pass my knowledge to you, my dearest readers, with the hopes of inspiring you, makes up for it.  

I’d like to speak in behalf of those who are challenged in practicing open communication; it can be frustrating and it’s not what anyone would like to go through. To go out of your comfort zone takes great might, and in all honesty, consistency is far more difficult to commit to. But it’s all about the process. It’s all about that extra self-push. We don’t need to get pressured over how fast we progress, learning open communication is a journey, and so we should embrace it.  

Speaking up takes a lot of courage for some people, and if you believe you’re one of them, it’s no coincidence that you’ve stumbled upon this blog. Take it as a sign that you need to gradually build a more open relationship with people present in your life; understand that by ‘relationship’, it doesn’t necessarily mean a romantic one, it can also mean the type of bond you have with your parents, siblings, children, or peers. Make a self-assessment and try to reflect on whether or not you’ve restricted yourself in times you’ve badly needed to speak up. Do you feel uncomfortable or anxious in expressing yourself to your life-partner? Are you afraid of being misinterpreted, judged, or getting laughed at by your relatives? Do you worry that your honesty may cause a close colleague of yours to feel sad or angry? If you happen to find these questions painfully relatable or agreeable, you better realize that you deserve more amount of respect you give yourself. If you care about other people’s thoughts and feelings, shouldn’t you care the same way to your own? Establish a better you and a better social relationship with open communication.  

During my younger years, I’ve dealt spending most of my time with friends who’ve unconsciously put me down. I never had the guts to confront them when I’d feel offended or disappointed with their words or actions; it was an unhealthy decision of mine to fake a laugh or do just about any act that’d make me seem unaffected. I hated the fact that I had to restrict myself from speaking my mind, but at the same time, I couldn’t help but be afraid of the possible aftermath if I did. I wanted these people to understand me, but I didn’t let them until I couldn’t bear to keep it in my system anymore.  

I want you to learn from my experience, and maybe if you had quite a similar issue from the past, you can do some self-tweaking. After all, you owe it to yourself and also to the people who care enough to understand you. Your voice matters and never think otherwise, because it really does. You need to step up and stop overthinking about how’d people react. Get it in your head that people are human too; they have individual thoughts and feelings just like you, so what’s the point of trying so hard to contain yours?  

If you’re having trouble in academics – speak up. If you’re in need of financial support – speak up. If you want to stand up for someone vulnerable – speak up. Open communication is your key; admit it to yourself and practice it.  

­­­­­­There are more advantages to speaking up than just being acknowledged or heard. Somehow it helps avoid future conflicts or problems from happening or arising, it strengthens the relationships you have with people who revolve around your life, and it generally encourages a person to learn from one another. It’s fascinating what our voices can do; and I believe we won’t stand a chance in this world without it. I wish I had realized and applied all these things I’ve mentioned much sooner. But having the opportunity to pass my knowledge to you, my dearest readers, with the hopes of inspiring you, makes up for it.  

I’d like to speak in behalf of those who are challenged in practicing open communication; it can be frustrating and it’s not what anyone would like to go through. To go out of your comfort zone takes great might, and in all honesty, consistency is far more difficult to commit to. But it’s all about the process. It’s all about that extra self-push. We don’t need to get pressured over how fast we progress, learning open communication is a journey, and so we should embrace it.  

Written by Jassamyn Tolentino

Written by Jassamyn Tolentino

Copyright 2020 ©

Copyright 2020 ©

MAXWELL DUAN

MAXWELL DUAN

Gmail

Gmail

Facebook

Facebook

What's app

What's app

Instagram

Instagram

Twitter

Twitter

MAXWELL DUAN

MAXWELL DUAN

PERSONAL FULFILLMENT

PERSONAL FULFILLMENT